Commentary

How Stronger Cities Could Help Fix Fragile Nations

As the terrorist attacks on Paris last week once again reminded us, weak or “fragile states” like Syria are often breeding grounds for violence. These states are not only less developed and less affluent—with lower levels of education and far lower levels of tolerance—they are also the least urbanized. In addition to military intervention and national security measures, part of the long-term strategy to revive these dysfunctional states must focus on city-building and urbanization.

Take a look at the map below from the 2015 edition of the Fragile States Index, which is based on a dozen key indicators of social and economic fragility such as poverty and economic decline, brain drain, and human rights for 178 nations. The most fragile areas—mainly in Africa and the Middle East—are highlighted in shades of in red.

Read the full article at The Atlantic’s CityLab